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JAYPEE JOURNALS
International Scientific Journals from Jaypee
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List of All Articles
1.  Invited Review
Revascularization of Necrotic Immature Permanent Teeth: An Update
N Velmurugan
[Year:2016] [Month:January-June] [Volume:1 ] [Number:1] [Pages:45] [Pages No:18-24] [No of Hits : 771]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10047-0006 | FREE

ABSTRACT

In the recent years, there is a paradigm shift in the management of necrotic immature permanent teeth, with most of these teeth being treated by revascularization rather than conventional apexification procedure. Current regenerative endodontic protocols (REP) emphasizes the need to have a disinfection protocols that will enable good disinfection without causing damage to stem cells. The current available evidence suggest that true pulp-dentin complex is not being formed after REP, nevertheless it can result in continued root development that will enable such tooth to survive for a long time. This article highlights the recent trends in revascularization procedures.

Keywords: Growth factor, Immature teeth, Revascularization, Scaffold, Stem cell.

How to cite this article: Velmurugan N. Revascularization of Necrotic Immature Permanent Teeth: An Update. J Oper Dent Endod 2016;1(1):18-24.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
2.  Case Report
Management of External Cervical Root Resorption in Mandibular Molar
Mahendran Kavitha, Shekar Shobana
[Year:2016] [Month:January-June] [Volume:1 ] [Number:1] [Pages:45] [Pages No:39-45] [No of Hits : 645]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10047-0010 | FREE

ABSTRACT

External root resorption of teeth takes its origin from periodontal tissues but is often an endodontic enigma. A combined endoperio management is required if the external resorption involves both entities. This article describes the management of an external resorption in mandibular first molar by intentional reimplantation using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) as an adjunctive diagnostic aid. Following atraumatic extraction of 36, endodontic treatment was performed extraorally, followed by sealing of the resorptive site using Biodentine. The periodontal procedures included guided tissue regeneration using a bioresorbable membrane and placement of osseograft for bone regeneration. After a follow-up period of 10 months, the patient was totally asymptomatic. Intentional reimplantation is a viable treatment option for external root resorption of inaccessible sites.

Keywords: Biodentine, External cervical root resorption, Guided tissue regeneration, Intentional reimplantation.

How to cite this article: Kavitha M, Shobana S. Management of External Cervical Root Resorption in Mandibular Molar. J Oper Dent Endod 2016;1(1):39-45.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
3.  Invited Review
Evolving from Principles of GV Black
A Parameswaran
[Year:2016] [Month:January-June] [Volume:1 ] [Number:1] [Pages:45] [Pages No:3-6] [No of Hits : 616]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10047-0003 | FREE

ABSTRACT

The Father of Modern Dentistry, Greene Vardiman Black, had played a vital role in elevating the dental profession to an autonomous status. Modern dentistry has continuously evolved from the time of GV Black. Now, there has been a paradigm shift in concept from ‘Extension for prevention’ to ‘Restriction with conviction’. ‘Medical model’ of caries management has been recognized as the most logical approach for success. The prediction of GV Black that ‘The professional person has no right to be other than a continuous student’ has become a reality. It is the duty of every conservative dentist to appreciate and adopt the changes and this will be the real tribute paid to the pioneers of the profession.

Keywords: Evolving principles, GV black, Modern dentistry.

How to cite this article: Parameswaran A. Evolving from Principles of Gv Black. J Oper Dent Endod 2016;1(1):3-6.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
4.  Invited Review
Microbiological Profile in Endodontic-periodontal Lesion
Meenakshisundaram Rajasekaran, Deepavalli Arumuga Nainar, Swarna Alamelu, Arun KV
[Year:2016] [Month:January-June] [Volume:1 ] [Number:1] [Pages:45] [Pages No:25-29] [No of Hits : 572]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10047-0007 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Endodontic-periodontal lesion is a clinical manifestation of the pathologic intercommunication between pulpal and periodontal tissues. In general, these lesions are multifaceted in nature and can have a varied pathogenesis. Fundamental to our understanding of the pulpoperiodontal lesions is the key role of the pathogenic ecosystem that exists within this complex structure. Evidence suggests that there exists a wide range of microbial species in the periapical and periodontal tissues and that their concurrent pathogenesis is constantly linked to the bacterial interrelations between the two tissue types. Understanding the microbial involvement is of utmost significance as it offers a rationale for differential diagnosis and subsequent management of such lesions. This review has attempted to provide a basic insight on the microbiome or the microbial flora entailed in the bidirectional pathogenesis of endodontic-periodontal lesions.

Keywords: Endodontic-periodontal lesion, Microbiology, Periapical lesion, Periodontal disease, Persistent disease.

How to cite this article: Rajasekaran M, Nainar DA, Alamelu S, KV Arun. Microbiological Profile in Endodontic-periodontal Lesion. J Oper Dent Endod 2016;1(1):25-29.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
5.  Invited Review
Treatment Outcomes in Endodontics
Raghu Srinivasan, Ramya Raghu
[Year:2016] [Month:January-June] [Volume:1 ] [Number:1] [Pages:45] [Pages No:13-17] [No of Hits : 570]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10047-0005 | FREE

ABSTRACT

The success of endodontic treatment has been of great interest to practitioners for many years now. Endodontic failures, which are of particular interest to us, are due to either microbial or nonmicrobial reasons. It is often thought that procedural errors like ledging, perforation, overfilling, underfilling or instrument separation invariably result in failure. In reality, the fact is that such mishaps only impede the accomplishment of an ideal root canal treatment. It is often the concomitant presence of infection that ultimately results in failure.
Numerous studies have evaluated the success or failure of endodontic therapy and reported a wide range of success rates from 40 to 93%.This wide range may be due to differences in clinical procedure, experimental design, criteria for evaluation and the length of the observation period. However, most authors conclude that the crucial factor influencing success is the preoperative status of the tooth. Teeth with an apical radiolucency show a 20% lower success rate than teeth without lesion.
Till date, the main method of evaluating success is radiographic, using recall radiographs. This method, however, is not without its own limitations due to examiner bias and inconsistencies.
The factors affecting treatment outcome include those related to diagnosis, preoperative condition of the patient and tooth, standard of care during treatment, postoperative factors and ongoing maintenance. This paper reviews the various factors influencing the outcome of endodontic treatment in light of modern thought.

Keywords: Failure, Postoperative factors, Preoperative factors, Standard of care, Success, Treatment outcome.

How to cite this article: Srinivasan R, Raghu R. Treatment Outcomes in Endodontics. J Oper Dent Endod 2016;1(1):13-17.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
6.  Invited Review
Biomineralization and Biomaterial Considerations in Dentin Remineralization
Xu Zhang, Zuohui Xiao, Haorong Wang, Anil Kishen
[Year:2016] [Month:January-June] [Volume:1 ] [Number:1] [Pages:45] [Pages No:7-12] [No of Hits : 556]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10047-0004 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Dentin is a composite hard tissue, comprising of inorganic and organic matrices, and regulated by many proteins during development. The demineralization of dentin results from the loss of inorganic matrix [mainly hydroxyapatite (HAP)], but the organic matrix (mainly type I collagen) will sustain for a period of time after demineralization. Over the past decade, there has been a growing interest on the remineralization of demineralized dentin, primarily in connection with minimally invasive caries management. More and more biomaterials and methods are currently being evaluated to achieve newer approaches for the remineralization of demineralized dentin. These strategies are mostly based on biomimetic approaches and aim to achieve the characteristics of natural hard tissue. This article will present a complete review on the basic compositions and properties of dentin, which formed the basis for the biomimetic remineralization of demineralized dentin.

Keywords: Biomineralization, Collagen, Dentin, Noncollagenous proteins, Remineralization.

How to cite this article: Zhang X, Xiao Z, Wang H, Kishen A. Biomineralization and Biomaterial Considerations in Dentin Remineralization. J Oper Dent Endod 2016;1(1):7-12.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
7.  REVIEW ARTICLE
Pain Management in Endodontics
Arunajatesan Subbiya, Angambakkam Rajasekaran Pradeepkumar
[Year:2016] [Month:July-December] [Volume:1 ] [Number:2] [Pages:51] [Pages No:76-81] [No of Hits : 495]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10047-0016 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Management of dental pain during and after endodontic treatment remains a big challenge. Dental anxiety can also influence the patient’s perception of pain and is known to directly lower the pain threshold. Psychological intervention in acute dental pain may be a very effective noninvasive measure to reduce pain. However, the pulp that has been diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis, with spontaneous, moderate-to-severe pain may not respond to the local anesthetic (LA) enough for the operator to pursue a painless treatment. In this review, pain predisposing factors and pain prevention techniques are evaluated, and various strategies to overcome anesthetic failures are reviewed which will help the practitioner achieve effective pain management.

Keywords: Anesthesia, Irreversible pulpits, Pain, Root canal, Success.

How to cite this article: Subbiya A, Pradeepkumar AR. Pain Management in Endodontics. J Oper Dent Endod 2016;1(2):76-81.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
8.  CASE REPORT
Invasive Cervical Resorption: A Clinical Case Report demonstrating the Value of CBCT in Diagnosis and Treatment Planning
Venkat Canakapalli
[Year:2016] [Month:July-December] [Volume:1 ] [Number:2] [Pages:51] [Pages No:87-89] [No of Hits : 455]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10047-0018 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Invasive cervical resorption (ICR) is a common clinical entity. Invasive cervical resorption can be arrested using the “Heithersay approach” (i.e., mechanical debridement, treatment with TCA, and restoration). Prudent case selection and proper execution can lead to the successful treatment and long-term retention of the tooth. The key aspects are the location, size, and accessibility of the lesion and the structural integrity of the tooth. Cone beam computed tomography imaging is an invaluable tool to assess and treat ICR.

Keywords: Cervical resorption, Cone beam computed tomography, Heithersay Approach, Invasice cervial resorption.

How to cite this article: Canakapalli V. Invasive Cervical Resorption: A Clinical Case Report demonstrating the Value of CBCT in Diagnosis and Treatment Planning. J Oper Dent Endod 2016;1(2):87-89.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
9.  Case Report
Unusual Location of a Second Mesiobuccal Canal in the Maxillary First Molar managed with the Aid of Cone-beam Computed Tomography
R Randhya, Sathish Sundar, Dinesh Kowsky, N Velmurugan, Buvaneshwari Arul
[Year:2016] [Month:January-June] [Volume:1 ] [Number:1] [Pages:45] [Pages No:35-38] [No of Hits : 442]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10047-0009 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The purpose of this article was to emphasize the importance of understanding root canal anatomy and its variations for successful endodontic treatment.

Methods: This case report presents the detection and endodontic management of eccentrically placed second mesiobuccal (MB) canal in maxillary first molar with the help of dental operating microscope and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanning.

Results: Cone-beam computed tomography images showed broad MB root with second MB canal located closer to palatal orifice.

Conclusion: This report describes a variation in canal location and complex anatomy of maxillary first molar with posttreatment apical periodontitis which was managed successfully with the aid of dental operating microscope and CBCT.

Keywords: Cone-beam computed tomography, Maxillary first molar, Second mesiobuccal canal.

How to cite this article: Randhya R, Sundar S, Kowsky D, Velmurugan N, Arul B. Unusual Location of a Second Mesiobuccal Canal in the Maxillary First Molar managed with the Aid of Cone-beam Computed Tomography. J Oper Dent Endod 2016;1(1):35-38.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
10.  ORIGINAL RESEARCH
Effect of 5% Calcium Hypochlorite on Mechanical Properties of Root Dentin: An in vitro Study
Poornima Reddy, Suma Balla, Sandhya S Raghu, Natanasabapathy Velmurugan, Garlapati T Gupta, Hrudi S Sahoo
[Year:2016] [Month:July-December] [Volume:1 ] [Number:2] [Pages:51] [Pages No:56-59] [No of Hits : 336]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10047-0012 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare in vitro the effect of 5% calcium hypochlorite [Ca(OCl)2] and 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) on flexural strength and modulus of elasticity of root dentin.

Materials and methods: The available chlorine concentration of each solution was determined using iodometric titration. Standardized planoparallel dentin bars (n = 20) were divided into two test groups and one control group. The control, group 1, consisted of dentin bars stored in normal saline. The dentin bars in the two test groups were treated by exposure to following solutions: Group 2 to 5% Ca(OCl)2; and group 3 to 5% NaOCl. All the three test solutions were changed once in 15 minutes for 30 minutes. The dentin bars were then loaded to failure using three-point bend test.

Results: Available chlorine concentration was 64% in both the test solutions. There was a significant reduction in the flexural strength of 5% NaOCl group compared to 5% Ca(OCl)2-treated ones. A significant difference in modulus of elasticity was observed between the test groups and the control groups and also between the 5% Ca(OCl)2 and 5% NaOCl groups.

Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, 5% NaOCl reduced the flexural strength and modulus of elasticity of root dentin bars more when compared to 5% Ca(OCl)2.

Keywords: Calcium hypochlorite, Elastic modulus, Endodontic irrigant, Flexural strength, Root dentin, Sodium hypochlorite.

How to cite this article: Reddy P, Balla S, Raghu SS, Velmurugan N, Gupta GT, Sahoo HS. Effect of 5% Calcium Hypochlorite on Mechanical Properties of Root Dentin: An in vitro Study. J Oper Dent Endod 2016;1(2):56-59.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
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